Paul Muldoon

  • « Certaines personnes, lorsqu'elles atteignent un certain âge, aiment consulter leur journal intime pour se remémorer des événements passés. Je n'en ai jamais tenu ; ce que j'ai, en revanche, ce sont mes chansons - des centaines -, qui m'aident à ne pas oublier. »
    Ainsi commence cet autoportrait émouvant de sincérité. Les versions définitives des textes de plus d'une centaine de chansons de Paul McCartney y côtoient des récits intimes, à propos de sa vie et de son oeuvre. En deux volumes, les chansons classées par ordre alphabétique proposent au lecteur une vision kaléidoscopique plutôt que chronologique, révélant les circonstances dans lesquelles elles ont été écrites, la façon dont elles ont pris forme, tout en évoquant nombre de personnages et de lieux qui les ont inspirées - hors du commun, et pourtant si simples. Ce qui en ressort, ce n'est pas un récit classique, mais une vie tout entière qui s'offre à nos yeux dans un panorama exhaustif : depuis l'adolescence de Paul McCartney jusqu'à son impressionnante carrière solo, en passant par la décennie légendaire des Beatles et par son groupe Wings.
    Édité et introduit par le poète Paul Muldoon, nourri de plusieurs centaines d'images totalement inédites - manuscrits, souvenirs, photographies -, cet ouvrage majeur, qui couvre soixante-quatre ans de la vie de Paul McCartney, s'impose comme l'oeuvre définitive d'une légende vivante de la musique.
    Né à Liverpool en 1942, Paul McCartney y a passé son enfance, accomplissant sa scolarité à la Liverpool Institute High School for Boys. Il vit toujours en Angleterre.
    Paul Muldoon, lauréat du Prix Pulitzer, est l'auteur de quatorze recueils de poésie, dont Howdie-Skelp.

  • Anglais Maggot

    Muldoon Paul

    'The most significant English-language poet born since the Second World War.' TLS

  • Paul Muldoon's new collection opens with a sonnet sequence, 'Horse Latitudes', written as the U.S. embarked on its foray into Iraq. Poems on historical battles where horses played an important part present us with a commentary on the political agenda of America today.

  • Anglais Lord Byron

    Muldoon Paul

    In this series, a contemporary poet selects and introduces a poet of the past. By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to the most important poets in our literature. She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that's best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes: Thus mellowed to that tender light Which heaven to gaudy day denies. -- She Walks in Beauty

  • Anglais Mules

    Muldoon Paul

    Mules, Paul Muldoon's second collection, was published in 1977. 'Muldoon seems to me unusually gifted, endowed with an individual sense of rhythm, a natural and copious vocabulary, a technical accomplishment and an intellectual boldness that mark him as the most promising poet to appear in Ireland for years.' Seamus Heaney

  • Why Brownlee Left, Paul Muldoon's third collection, was published in 1980.

  • Anglais Quoof

    Muldoon Paul

    'These poems delight in a wily, mischievous, nonchalant negotiation between the affections and attachments of Muldoon's own childhood, family and place, and the ironic discriminations of a cool literary sensibility and historical awareness.' Times Literary Supplement

  • Between New Weather (1973), which Seamus Heaney said marked its author as 'the most promising poet to appear in Ireland for years', and The Annals of Chile, which was awarded the T. S. Eliot Prize for the best book of poems of 1994, Paul Muldoon amassed an incomparable body of work. New Selected Poems 1968-1994 offers the author's own choice from his first seven Faber collections, his pamphlets and his opera libretto Shining Brow, and serves as the ideal introduction for readers not yet familiar with his superabundant gifts. 'The most significant English-language poet born since the Second World War.' Times Literary Supplement

  • Anglais Hay

    Muldoon Paul

    Paul Muldoon's collection Hay refines, and re-defines, a lyrical strain in which an ostensible lightness of touch still has the strength to bear the weightiest subject matter. At once conventional and cutting edge, beautiful and bleak, Hay is a book that demonstrates fully the range of Muldoon's poetic intelligence and imagination.

  • Anglais Bandanna

    Muldoon Paul

    Following his highly-praised Shining Brow (1993), which was also written as an opera libretto for the American composer Daron Aric Hagen, Paul Muldoon's Bandanna takes us into very different territory. Its action is set in a small town on the Mexican border; it includes illegal immigrants and corrupt law officers among its dramatis personae; but at its heart is an old-fashioned tale of sexual jealousy and murderous revenge. The drama is powered by a strong emotional thrust, most of it conveyed in the form of popular song, and leading to a devastating climax. Bandanna demonstrates yet again the ever-increasing range of this most versatile of poets.

  • The Annals of Chile is Paul Muldoon's seventh collection of poems and contains, amongst other things, celebrations of the birth of his daughter, a plangent and frankly personal lament fo the artist Mary Farl Powers, and a long fantasy invoking the world of boys' adventure stories, over which the poet's mother presides as a benign influence.

  • Meeting the British is Paul Muldoon's fifth collection of poems. They range from an account of the first recorded case of germ wafare, though a meditation on a bar of soap, to a sequence of monologues spoken by some of the famous, or infamous, inhabitants of '7, Middagh Street,', New York, on Thanksgiving Day, 1940.

  • The End of the Poem contains the fifteen lectures delivered by Paul Muldoon as Oxford Professor of Poetry, from 1999 to 2004. Rather than individual and discrete performances, these lectures form a dazzling set of variations around the sustained theme of 'the end of the poem'. Each lecture explores a different sense of an ending: whether a poem can ever be a free-standing structure, read and written in isolation from other poems; whether a poem's line-endings are forms of closure (and where this might leave the poem in prose); whether the poem is completed only with the reader's act of understanding; whether revision brings a poem nearer to its ideal ending (when does a poet know when a poem has come to an end?); what is the right true end of poetry, and is the end of the poem the beginning of criticism, including an Arnoldian 'criticism of life'?

  • 'Thirty years of work from "the most significant English-language poet born since the second world war.' The Times Literary Supplement

  • Originally commissioned by Madison Opera as a libretto for American composer Daron Aric Hagen, Shining Brow can be read as a dramatic poem in its own right. Displaying all the structural ingenuity and subtle resonance that have marked Paul Muldoon as the most influential poet of his generation, it tells, with suitable bravura, the story of architectural genius Frank Lloyd Wright and his catastrophic affair with the wife of a wealthy client.

  • WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE FOR POETRY 2003 Paul Muldoon's ninth collection of poems, his first since Hay (1998), finds him working a rich vein that extends from the rivery, apple-heavy County Armagh of the 1950s, where he was brought up, to suburban New Jersey, on the banks of a canal dug by Irish navvies, where he now lives. Grounded, glistening, as gritty as they are graceful, these poems seem capable of taking in almost anything, and anybody, be it a Tuareg glimpsed on the Irish border, Bessie Smith, Marilyn Monroe, Queen Elizabeth I, a hunted hare, William Tell, William Butler Yeats, Sitting Bull, Ted Hughes, an otter, a fox, Mr and Mrs Stanley Joscelyne, an unearthed pit pony, a loaf of bread, an outhouse, a killdeer, Oscar Wilde, or a flock of redknots. At the heart of the book is an elegy for a miscarried child, and that elegiac tone predominates, particularly in the elegant remaking of Yeats's 'A Prayer for My Daughter' with which the book concludes, where a welter of traffic signs and slogans, along with the spirits of admen, hardware storekeepers, flim-flammers, fixers and other forebears, are borne along by a hurricane-swollen canal, and private grief coincides with some of the gravest matter of our age.

  • The four pieces that make up this work are taken from Muldoon's Oxford Clarendon Lectures of 1998. Together, they take the form of an A-Z, or abecedary of Irish literature, in which his imagination forges links between disparate aspects and individuals in the Irish literary landscape, ranging back and forth between modern and medieval. From Beckett and Bowen, through MacNeice, Swift and Yeats - and guided throughout by Joyce - To Ireland, I moves lightly through the long grass of Irish writing. The result is a provocative handbook for the literary traveller, who is treated to an astonishing display of scholarship and idiosyncratic inwardness from Irish literature over the course of a millennium.

  • New Weather was Paul Muldoon's first book of poems. When it appeared in 1973, Seamus Heaney described its author as 'unusually gifted, endowed with an individual sense of rhythm, a natural and copious vocabulary, a technical accomplishment and an intellectual boldness that mark him as the most promising poet to appear in Ireland for years.' While the promise has been amply fulfilled, New Weather gives the poet's many, more recent admirers the opportunity to see what a versatile and substantial artist he was from the outset.

  • In this new collection Paul Muldoon goes back to the essential meaning of the term 'lyric' -a short poem sung to the accompaniment of a musical instrument. These words are written for music, assuredly, with half an ear to Yeats's ballad-singing porter drinkers and half to Cole Porter-and indeed, many of them double as rock songs, performed by the Wayside Shrines, the Princeton-based music collective of which Muldoon is a member. Their themes are the classic themes of song: lost love, lost wars, Charlton Heston, barbed wire, pole dancers, cellulite, Hegel, elephants, Oedipus, more barbed wire, Buddy Holly, Jersey peaches, Julius Caesar, Trenton, cockatoos, and the Youngers (Bob and John and Jim and Cole).The Word on the Street is a lively addition to this Pulitzer Prize-winning poet's masterful body of work. It demonstrates, once again, that, as Richard Eder has written in the pages of the New York Times Book Review, 'Paul Muldoon is a shape-shifting Proteus to readers who try to pin him down . . . Those who interrogate Muldoon's poems find themselves changing shapes each time he does.'

  • Paul Muldoon's new book, his twelfth collection of poems, is wide-ranging in its subject matter yet is everywhere concerned with watchfulness. Heedful, hard won, head-turning, heartfelt, these poems attempt to bring scrutiny to bear on everything, including scrutiny itself. One Thousand Things Worth Knowing confirms Nick Laird's assessment, in the New York Review of Books, that Paul Muldoon is 'the most formally ambitious and technically innovative of modern poets, [who] writes poems like no one else.'

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