Lilliput Press Digital

  • Anglais Jammet's of Dublin

    Maxwell Alison

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 15 February 2012

    From 1901 to 1967 this Dublin restaurant – so famous in its day that letters simply addressed ‘Jammet's, Europe' reached their destination within a week – was the resort of actors, politicians, artists and literati, film stars, judges, journalists, doctors, chancers and characters, gourmets and oenophiles, who passed through its doors in search of superb food and wine, or banter in the bars. Praised by Egon Ronay for its ‘space, grace and charm', the ‘formidable list of culinary delicacies' and the ‘numerous, very great clarets', this legendary French dining establishment had no peer in Ireland, and gave occasion to many a tale: Jack B. Yeats, sketching a bucking horse on a birthday menu; Liam O'Flaherty, giving rein to his; Patrick Kavanagh, in search of a mistress; Maeve Binchy, celebrating her Leaving Cert.; Garech Browne, watching Nicholas Gormanston rescue Seán O'Sullivan from immersion in a bowl of pea-green soup; Micheál MacLiammóir, being upstaged by one of the staff. Pages from the Visitors' Book with its autographs are redolent of a golden age: Maureen O'Hara, Bertie Smyllie, Bing Crosby, Judy Garland, Maurice Jarre, Ingrid Bergman, Elizabeth Taylor, the Beverley Sisters. John Lennon drew a self- portrait and commented, ‘The other three are saving up to come here!' Added to the visual mix are original menu cards and recipes, a 200-strong wine list with suppliers and prices, and fabulous foods: a rich iconography affording rare insights into the social and cultural life of Dublin during the sixty-six years of Jammet's treasured existence. At the heart of this lively narrative is a truffle of memoir by Shay Harpur, who rose from cloakroom attendant to sommelier in five short years, and recounts a day-in-the-life of Jammet's with vivid particularity. A closing essay by the late Patrick Campbell celebrates the warmth and idiosyncracy of its famed back bar.

  • Anglais Trinity Tales

    Gilfillan Kathy

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 15 February 2012

    These time-capsule recollections of Trinity College students in the seventies include those of U2 manager Paul McGuinness, director of the Gate Theatre Michael Colgan, novelist James Ryan, writer Robert O'Byrne, judge Fidelma Macken, publisher Antony Farrell, Dillie Keane of Fascinating Aida, Mary Harney, Liz O'Donnell and others, who have in different ways shaped the Ireland of today. The seventies were significant, with Catholic students allowed into the College as British grants enabled a welcome invasion by the Northern Irish; post-Woodstock, a global counterculture was at work. Together, Irish nationals and expats created an interesting fusion of sensibilities, styles and philosophies. As the decade of political and social upheaval unfolded - from the availability of the Pill to the horrors of Bloody Sunday and the Dublin bombings - Irish youth came to embrace a changed Ireland. Buoyed by idealism and other substances but tethered by pragmatism, contributors to Trinity Tales mirror a time when everything felt possible. Kathy Gilfillan (TCD 1968-72) has gathered in an extraodinary mix of evocative personal narratives, which will resonate whether you went to Trinity or not.

  • Anglais Afterlives

    O'Rawe Richard

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    '...a compelling, powerful and virtually incontestable case that in the summer of 1981 Gerry Adams and those around him thwarted a proposed settlement of the IRA/INLA hunger strikes' Ed Moloney, author of A Secret History of the IRA.< < 'Afterlives by Richard O'Rawe (Lilliput Press) is the history of the deal that could have ended the hunger strikes in 1981 and is the book no historian of the period will be able to ignore. O'Rawe makes a contribution to history that is substantially greater than anything we've had to date.' -- www.pageonebook.com
    < By July 1981 four republican hunger strikers had already died in Long Kesh Prison. A fifth, Joe McDonnell, was clinging to life. To outsiders, Margaret Thatcher appeared unbending; yet, far from the prying eyes of the press, her government was making a substantial offer to the prisoners. On 5 July this offer was given to Gerry Adams in Belfast, and relayed to the prison leadership. In this important sequel to the bestseller Blanketmen, O'Rawe documents the four-year war of words that followed. He interviews former members of the IRA Army Council who claim that a five-man committee led by Adams had control of the hunger strike, keeping the Army Council in the dark about the British government's offer. He uses contemporary records to show that Thatcher had approved the offer but that Gerry Adams and the committee had replied it was 'not enough', telling the hunger strikers that 'nothing was on the table'. The prson leadership accepted the British offer, but six hunger strikers went on to die. O'Rawe asks: why? This hidden history, using contemporaneous photographs, pinpoints the key players in the drama and their responses, identifying Mountain Climber, a Derry businessman who brokered the deal, and describing the contributors to the crucial hunger strike conferences of 2008-09. O'Rawe combines a moving and courageous personal record with first-hand documentation. He provides essential background and astringent commentary on the realpolitick of the peace process and republicanism in Northern Ireland today, and its impact upon the country as a whole. With a Foreword by Ed Moloney, author of The Official History of the IRA.

  • Anglais Gander at the Gate

    O'Connor Rory

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    "The poet W.B. Yeats desired to produce written work that, while it had been arduously crafted, would appear as immediate and spontaneous as the ordinary spoken words of people. It is a testament to the achievement of Rory O'Connor that he has accomplished just that by writing a memoir that connects closely to the oral tradition. ... It could be hoped, perhaps, that every community - urban and rural - would have a Rory O'Connor among them who would possess the ability of capturing that society in all its vitality, colour and mystery. If that were possible they would - like this present book - make for fascinating reading." -Derek Hand, Sunday Business Post. "I loved the book ... I carried Rory O'Connor's vivid images and phrases around with me in my imagination long after I had finished reading. He seems to have had the type of magical, untrammelled childhood, populated with extraordinary characters, to which we have all aspired." - Deirdre Purcell. "Gander at the Gate is the best book of its kind since Twenty Years A-Growing. It is vibrant, humorous, delightful, nostalgic and deeply moving to the point of tears ... The characters are wonderful, especially Uncle Jack, who deserves a book to himself sometime. This is a book full of the magical lunacies of a family and it is also a history of a troubled time in which the author's father was a major figure ... I shall read it again and again." - John B. Keane. "Rory O'Connor is a gifted writer, so gifted, in fact, that he can turn the reader into a listener. O'Connor's style of writing is also a style of oral telling. And he is a master storyteller, evoking what he calls "the wonders of life" with consummate skill. He deals with a past that ranges from the gentle to the murderous, the violent and grim to the humorous and fantastical. Gander at the Gate is completely authentic, a gripping feat of memory, a candid, detailed evocation of a lost world." -Brendan Kennelly. Knocknagoshel, north Kerry, in the 1930s. Autumn mornings with mist rolling over a 'kindly and fertile land'; the pungent smoke of turf fires; open-air wrestling contest; convoys of tinkers with their piebald ponies; farm boys and servant girls aching with desire; and a cast of remarkable men and even more remarkable women, fiery and forthright, their lives 'teeming with the emotions of love and jealousy, and human conflict, common among all the simple people of the world'. Through the lyrical prose of Rory O'Connor, Gander at the Gate tells of an Irish farmhouse, the family who lived there, and the community of which they were part. We discover the imaginings and adventures of the local 'goboys'; the widow Delia and her sons lost to America; and the eccentric Uncle Jack, full of 'riddles, and recitations, and the latest rhymes and small poems'. As the gander of the title - the fiercest beast of the farmyard - begins to intrude on his consciousness, O'Connor describes his father's experience of Ireland's civil war. This is the most magical evocation of people and place to be published in recent Irish literature. Rory O'Connor gives a potent life to the ghosts of time in a book that has all the hallmarks of a classic.

  • Anglais Lark's Eggs

    Hogan Desmond

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    Des Hogan is, and has always been, the real thing - a writer of great originality, dramatic flair, linguistic invention - who remakes the world every time he puts pen to paper.' Neil Jordan. Desmond Hogan is one of most remarkable literary talents to have come out of Ireland in the past half-century. Larks' Eggs affirms that stature. Here, with twenty-two classic stories taken from earlier collections and twelve fresh narratives, Hogan displays anew his lyricism, compassion and sheer prismatic brilliance. His subject is exile and self-image, explored through isolates and eccentrics, brittle lives trapped by poverty, personal histories and restless identities, giving a voice to those on the margins -Travellers, the misplaced, the dispossessed. Describing 'The Airedale' in William Trevor's The Oxford Book of Short Stories, Cressida Connolly wrote: 'it is profound, moving and exquisitely executed. Hogan is one of the finest writers alive today and deserves to be much better known.' In the Times Literary Supplement, Joyce Carol Oates called 'Winter Swimmers' an 'elegiac, daringly sustained prose poem; a collage of meticulously rendered Irish scenes that weaves in and out of tales of tinkers and youths'. The San Francisco Chronicle remarked: 'Desmond Hogan's mastery of language and characterization rivals that of Flannery O'Connor and Anton Chekhov; never has the psychological landscape of the exile been rendered with such incisive, haunting prose.' Larks' Eggs' compelling tales of diaspora are both global and local, telling of subsumed identity and allurement, of past merging with present through landscape and mindscape. Desmond Hogan's fragmented personas are repositories for childhood memory and a collective unconscious that is distinctly Irish and history-burdened, while exhilaratingly and wholly universal and modern. 'Here's to the storytellers. They made sense of these lonely and driven lives of ours.' The Lilliput Press is proud to reintroduce one of Ireland's most evocative prose writers. Desmond Hogan takes his place alongside Joyce, Plunkett, Trevor, O'Faolain, Kiely and McGahern.

  • Anglais Mirror Mirror

    Prone Terry

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    Terry Prone once thought plastic surgery was for the vain, the self-regarding and the rich. She thought herself the person least likely to submit to the plastic surgeon's scalpel. But this was before a traumatic car crash in which the steering wheel caved in her cheekbones, broke her jaw and smashed her teeth. In the days and weeks that followed, she began to understand how radically her appearance had changed. She then embarked on a journey of physical -- and emotional -- reconstruction that gradually became an addiction. Liposuction. Tooth implants. An arm-lift. Two face-lifts and a brow-lift. Diamond eye surgery. Foot surgery. She found she could not stop. Mirror Mirror tells the dramatic story of Terry Prone's experience of plastic surgery on both sides of the Atlantic and reveals the truth about each procedure: discomforts, costs, failures and (mostly) successes. Charged with her remarkable candour, it is an astonishing story of courage and personal reinvention -- and a hilarious exploration of the wilder shores of plastic surgery.

  • Anglais Nostos

    Moriarty John

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    In this astonishing volume of autobiography, John Moriarty's earlier works of mystical philosophy, Dreamtime and Turtle Was Gone a Long Time, are given a biographical grounding. Inhabited by all that he reads and perceives, Moriarty recovers lost forms of sensibility and categories of understanding, reconciling them gloriously within the arc of his life. Nostos is a Greek word meaning 'homecoming'. In its plural form, nostoi, it was the name of an extensive body of literature in ancient Greece about the Greek heroes who returned from the Trojan Wars. Most of this literature has perished, but we do have The Odyssey, describing the long homecoming of Odysseus to Ithaca. Moriarty's book assumes that for various reasons humanity is now exiled from the earth, but by reimagining it and ourselves as involved in a common destiny, it enacts a homecoming, a nostos to it. Nostos is a continuous narrative describing early on how its author lost his world as surely and completely as the Aztecs lost theirs when Cortez came ashore. Thereafter, in places as far apart as neolithic North Kerry and London, Periclean Athens and Blackfoot Dancing Ground, Manitoba and Mexico, Kwakiutl coast and Connemara, the author fights his way to a kind of rest, to a requiem, at the heart of things as they terribly and resplendently are. 'The classical, Eastern and Amer-Indian legends that have informed Moriarty's life are recreated or re-enacted in this deeply personal document, which is paradoxically rich in encounters with the physical world and tender episodes of love and loss, while giving us a disturbing insight into the terrors and rare ecstasies of the hermit's lonely struggle.' - Tim Robinson

  • Anglais Overnight to Innsbruck

    Woods Denyse

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    On an overnight train to Innsbruck, ex-lovers Richard and Frances meet each other by chance many years after their mysterious separation on a train journey through the blistering heat and vast empty expanses of the Sudanese desert. As they each tell their separate stories of fear, confusion and loss, they try to unravel the truth of what happened - and confront the bitter possibility that one of them may be lying. As their train hurtles through a long sleepless night, a third passenger eavesdrops on their conversation, mesmerized by a complex dialogue that probes into the very nature of truth and personal identity. A story of love and doubt, Overnight to Innsbruck is charged throughout with tantalizing puzzles and all the tension of a first-class psychological thriller - and marks the debut of a remarkably fresh and original voice in Irish literature.

  • Anglais Trinity Tales

    Sebastian Balfour

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    Trinity College Dublin of the 1960s was an unusual, even unique institution, where students from Ireland, England and farther afield came together at a fascinating time in post-war Europe. TCD then was a small, mainly Protestant university, founded in 1592 curiously cut off from but also a part of an old Catholic city with her ‘seedy elegance' and ‘gentle veils of rain'. It remains an eccentric, self-contained world, richly textured and defining for those who embraced it. Trinity Tales explores this milieu as it is refracted through the lenses of its thirty-six distinguished contributors, from Roy Foster, Jeremy Lewis and Derek Mahon, to Donnell Deeny, Heather Lukes and John Stephenson alumni who overlapped and acted their part in rehearsal for a life beyond the walls. This book, with its period iconography, is an invaluable evocation of that culture and those players. Contributors: Bernard Adams, Sebastian Balfour, Ian Blake, Terence Brady, Edna Broderick, Rock Brynner, Mary Carr, Jacques Chuto, Christopher Jane Corkery, Michael de Larrabeiti, Deborah de Vere White, Donnell Deeny, Mike Dibb, Damian Duggan-Ryan, Roy Foster, Andy Gibb, Rosemary Gibson (a tribute), Nicholas Grene, Gill Hanna, Tom Haran, Douglas Henderson, Ann Heyno, Peter Hinchcliffe, Laurie Howes, Turlough Johnston, Jeremy Lewis, Michael Longley, Heather Lukes, Ray Lynott, Derek Mahon, Fawzia Salama, John Stephenson, Harriet Turton, Mirabel Walker, Anthony Weale and John Wilkinson.

  • Anglais Watching the Door

    Myers Kevin

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    As an Irish Catholic raised in Leicester, fresh from University College Dublin with a first in History, Kevin Myers is sent north to work for the Belfast bureau of RTE News. There he covers the increasingly vicious conflict erupting in the city as the IRA campaign begins. Reporting too for Dublin's Hibernia, the London Observer and NBC Radio for North America, Kevin Myers becomes the eyes and ears for an uncomprehending world, chronicling the collapse of Northern Irish society, from internment to the La Mon bombing. Raw, candid and courageous, Watching the Door documents the deeds of loyalist gangs, provos, paratroopers, politicians, British agents and an indomitable citizenry, forming a remarkable double portrait of a divided society and an emergent self -- a witness to humanity, and inhumanity, on both sides of a sectarian faultline. In his wonderfully vivid, trenchant, first-hand account of life on the streets of Belfast during the height of the Troubles, a young Kevin Myers witnesses the blood fueds and chaos of a people on the brink of civil war. His descriptions of violence, counter-violence and emotional free-fall, combine humour with reflection, eros with thanatos; they render history in the making. By interweaving the political and the personal in a tale at once self-deprecating, poignant and sexually buoyant, Watching the Door is a coming-of-age story like no other. It is evocative and passionate, and it records a pivotal time in Ireland's recent past, blendig articulacy with savage indignation in a classic of modern reportage.

  • Anglais Wicked Little Joe

    Hone Joseph

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    ‘In the summer of 1939, as a two-year-old in London, I was given away by my parents to a Chelsea friend and taken on the Irish Mail to Dublin.' Thus begins this extraordinary memoir by travel writer and novelist Joseph Hone, one of eight children farmed out by impecunious and inebriate parents, who was raised at Maidenhall in County Kilkenny by the historian and essayist Hubert Butler and his wife Peggy, sister of Tyrone Guthrie of Annaghmakerrig in County Monaghan. The story is told through a cache of letters discovered on Hubert Butler's death between he and his friend 'Old Joe', Little Joe's grandfather and biographer of Yeats and George Moore, upon whom fell the financial responsibility for his grandson's upbringing. This account of Joseph Hone's childhood and youth during the 1940s and 50s in rural Ireland, among the privileged and artistic elite of his generation living down-at-heel if comfortable lives in a newly emergent state, is an enthralling reminder of the happenstance and precariousness of all our lives. Like William Trevor, Joe was boarded out at Sandford Park in Dublin and then at St Columba's, both of which he documents in loving and comic detail, gaining as much stimulation from his home environment as from the excesses and disappointments of these single-sex establishments. He writes with feeling and insight of the lives of those in his circle and beyond - his teachers and foster parents and friends - working as an assistant for John Ford during the making of The Quiet Man, and finding himself as the writer he was to become. This numinous work of autobiography and self-interrogation bears comparison with Nabokov's Speak Memory or Frank O'Connor's An Only Child. It will take its place as a classic of the genre while illuminating unknown corners of Ireland's cultural landscape. "A brilliant, often hilariously funny, and above all, beautifully written story." Irish Arts Review. "An invaluable account of an unusual upbringing and a wonderful portrait of two Irish men of letters..." 5 stars - The Dubliner

  • Anglais A Poet's Country

    Antoinette Quinn

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    While Patrick Kavanagh (1904-67) was above all a poet, for most of his writing life he was a prolific producer of critical and autobiographical prose. Work for newspapers and magazines was often his main source of income, and provided him with a necessary outlet for his views on the writers of his time, and past times; on the spiritual function of poetry; and on his own background and experiences as an isolated genius, impoverished, sometimes ostracized, and surrounded, as he saw it, by mediocrity. The prose complements the poetry telling us things about Kavanagh that the poems do not tell. This is the first authoritative gathering of the shorter prose writings. Edited and introduced by Antoinette Quinn, Kavanagh's leading interpreter and biographer, A Poet's Country: Selected Prose supplants the earlier, inadequate 1967, Collected Pruse, which contained material already available elsewhere and focused on later writings at the expense of work from the vital decades of the thirties and forties. A Poet's Country is both a reliable scholarly edition and an immensely readable, entertaining collection. It contains the essential shorter prose works from throughout Kavanagh's career: the legendary autobiographical pieces and rural reminiscences and a thorough selection of Kavanagh's penetrating, sometimes scabrous, literary and cultural criticism. Its verve and musicality, poignancy and pitch, rage and glory, expresses as no other the voice of rural Ireland.

  • Anglais Joycean Murmoirs

    Christine O'Neill

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    In charge of the Zurich James Joyce Foundation since its inception in 1985, Fritz Senn has studied the life and works of James Joyce for five decades, published widely and taught across Europe and the United States. He has been on the editorial board of all major Joyce journals, co-founded A Wake Newsletter with Clive Hart in the 1980s and supervised and co-ordinated the Frankfurt Joyce Edition with Klaus Reichert from 1969 to 1971. He has also instigated and co-organized several international Joyce Symposia. In Joycean Murmoirs, Christine O'Neill, a Zurich Joyce scholar based in Dublin, has drawn Senn out in numerous, wide-ranging interviews about Joyce and his works, the global Joyce community and friends, problems of translation, Joyce and Homer, the Zurich James Joyce Foundation, the intricacies of language and, not least, his own life and personality. These thought-provoking exchanges lend a privileged view of a richly eclectic literary and cultural milieu, giving glimpses of leading scholars and commentators from Richard Ellmann to Niall Montgomery and Anthony Burgess. They form a fascinating composite portrait of one of Europe's foremost international Joyceans

  • Anglais Rebellions

    Dunne Tom

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    REVISED AND EXTENDED SECOND EDITION ‘Rebellions is an autobiography, an astonishingly clear-sighted and lucid account of a tragic and disputed episode in Irish history and a polemic. The book's importance, originality and real value arise from the way the personal, the political and the scholarly are each offered as passionate witness and not separated. The rebellion of 1798 in Wexford and its two hundredth anniversary have found a brilliant and fearless chronicler. This is essential reading for anyone interested in the arguments about how the past cut deeply into the way we live in Ireland now.'- Colm Tóibín. This is a new, extended edition of an unusual book, which generated considerable interest and controversy when it was first published in 2004, and won the Ewart Biggs Memorial Prize the following year. In its original form it had three elements, a memoir giving the author's intellectual and political formation and his family connection to 1798 in Wexford, a critique of the bicentenary of the rebellion and of writing about it, and a detailed account of the pivotal battle of New Ross and the massacre nearby at Scullabogue. The new edition adds a fourth layer of exploration, analysing the reception of the book, by historians, by those involved in the bicentenary, and by the many individuals who wrote to the author. The most unusual response came from the Ryan Commission on child abuse, which explored with the author his experiences as a junior member of the Irish Christian Brothers, and quoted him extensively in its report. The new chapter focuses on the theme common to all of these responses, the conflict between emotional identification with a community's history and the evidence for contrary realities.

  • Anglais Remembering How we Stood

    Ryan John

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    With a foreword by J.P. Donleavy. The best book about literary Dublin ever written' - FRANK DELANEY. Edna O'Brien chose John Ryan's memoirs as her Observer Book of the Year in 1975, describing it as a fine and loving account of literary Dublin in the golden fifties', which purrs with life and anecdote'. This classic evocation of the period 1945-55 celebrates a city and its personalities - Brendan Behan, Patrick Kavanagh, Myles na gCopaleen (Flann O'Brien), as well as Pope' O'Mahony, Gainor Crist the original Ginger Man, and others - a remarkable group who were to revitalize post-war literature in Ireland. As friend, publisher and fellow artist, Ryan paints a vivid picture of this ebullient, fertile milieu: No more singular body of characters will ever rub shoulders again at any given time, or a city more uniquely bizarre than literary Dublin will ever be seen.' As one reads his words, dressed in their wonderful finery of irony, the world he speaks of reblossoms to be back again awhile. To see, feel and smell the Dublin of that day; a masterpiece of reminiscence' - from the foreword by J.P. Donleavy

  • Anglais Roger Casement

    210 Sìochàin Séamas

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    Séamas Ó Sìocháin has written what is the most voluminous biography of Casement and a significant contribution to an understanding of his life.' Frank Callinan, The Irish Times Roger Casement is among the most written about and mythologized figures in Irish history, yet has never, until now, been accorded such an impartial, full-scale documentary biography. Séamas Ó Sìocháin gives us an enthralling book equal to the expansive life of its subject. In its meticulous scholarship it supersedes all previous work in the field. Drawing upon an astonishing trove of official and personal sources, Ó Sìocháin shows how what began as an ordinary career in the British consular service became a singular crusade across three continents, against exploitation, cruelty and injustice. Casement served in the Niger, Mozambique, Angola and most momentously in the Congo, where he witnessed the appalling crimes of the Belgian colonial system and became a leading figure in the humanitarian campaign, eventually successful, to force King Leopold II to surrender his personal control of the colony. Casement later applied the same eye for injustice to the depressingly similar exploitation of natives of the Putumayo, in the upper reaches of the Amazon, where, as in the Congo, outsiders' hunger for rubber created misery for native peoples. His growing interest and involvement in Irish nationalism, culminating in his attempts to aid the 1916 Rising and execution for treason, is compellingly narrated. Ó Sìocháin analysis, which closely examines the debate around Casement's controversial diaries, is also a model of clarity and attention to detail. This definitive biography, accompanied by additional maps and numerous photographs, many of them rare and unseen, is an enduring monument to one of Ireland's most enigmatic patriots of the past century.

  • Anglais Mushroom Man

    Tullio Paulo

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    I found it compelling - mystique and mystery are interwoven with great cunning and guile.' - John Boorman. Mushroom.man is the tale of a loner whose move to the mountains takes him on a self-styled odyssey mapped by hallucinogenic experiences. Sixties man, primal man, shaman, nowhereman, everyman: mushroom.man enters the world of the forests, fungi and spiritual discovery on the trail of an ancient and holy mystery. As an unlikely communication opens up between mushroom.man and a curious psychologist, a strange life unfolds. 'Very entertaining - written with economy and imagination drawing the reader in.' - Tom Moriarty, The Irish Times 'Brilliant - a strange life story unfolds in lyrical prose.' - Matthew Seton Sell, Magill

  • Anglais Irish Eccentrics

    Somerville-Large Peter

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    Ireland's history has long been illuminated, and enlivened, by bizarre, colourful, extravagant, unfettered individuals: ripe country-house eccentrics, saints, scholars, bucks and hell-rakes, duellists, abductors, rhymers and miracle-makers. These factual and fascinating biographical sketches make for 'delightful reading' (Frank Muir). First published in 1975 this new edition includes fresh material and is now in its second printing. Reviews of the 1975 edition: 'Mr Somerville-Large writes with élan and erudition' - Tim Heald, The Times. 'A delightful compendium of sheer nuttiness. If, as sociologists suggest, eccentricity is a luxury, Ireland is portrayed in this book as one of the most luxurious countries anywhere.' - Malcolm MacPherson, Newsweek. 'Mr Somerville-Large has probed the annals of dim Anglo-Irish families to produce a rare gallery of human curiosities. All human life is here with a vengeance, and in these affectionately presented pages its vagaries know no bounds. ' - William Trevor, The Guardian. 'Peter Somerville-Large has parcelled up as colourful a batch of nature's sports as could be found a whisker this side of lunacy, and has written about them in a witty detached prose style which admirably sets off their extraordinary behaviour S delightful reading.' - Frank Muir, The Spectator

  • Anglais North of Naples South of Rome

    Tullio Paulo

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    'People from all over Italy lay claim to living in the real Italy, but they are wrong. The real Italy lies here, in the Comino Valley, north of Naples, south of Rome, high in the mountains, surrounded by the Apennine peaks.' Since childhood, Paolo Tullio has returned each year to his hometown of Gallinaro and the immoderate, warmhearted people of his valley, delightfully evoked here. North of Naples, South of Rome encompasses a chaotic wine competition, the Italian cantina, market-day haggling and truffle-hunting, winning a local election, roasting a pig whole, and the scams and the charms of Naples. It looks in disbelief at local bureaucracy, and observes the Catholic Church's relationship to daily life. With fascinating detours on local buildings, history, folklore and fashion, the reader is taken aboard a carousel of picnics, feasts and fireworks, illuminating an unknown and irresistible corner of Italy. 'Less manipulative than Peter Mayle ... a wonderful initiation to the piquant joys of Italian country living ... As reviving as a hot espresso.' - The Sunday Times. 'A genuine warm breeze of Italy blows from these pages.' - Brian Fallon, The Irish Times. ' ...this book will warm the heart, expand the soul, and can even be used to nourish the body.' - Image. 'A delightful, often hilarious insight to the Italy of today. If you want to know what makes the real Italy and real Italians tick, do not on any account neglect to read this. You will be intrigued and delighted.' - Tim Cranmer, Cork Examiner. Tullio brings his home town and the valley stretching beneath alive to us with all their faults, beauty and charm. It deserves to be more widely read than the book the fellow wrote about Provence.' - Gillian Somerville Large, Irish Independent. 'Colourful, sometimes hilarious, sometimes frustration and pathos filled, this is a fascinating portrayal of family life in and around the little Italian town that has been home to the author and his many relatives for 600 years.' - Marian Curd, The Universe

  • Anglais The Edge of the City

    Hogan Desmond

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    Desmond Hogan is one of Ireland's leading writers. In addition to his novels and stories, he has travelled widely (for various newspapers) to some of the strangest and most fascinating parts of the world. In the past fifteen years, he has visited Soviet Russia, Central America, Europe, Africa and the Middle East. Each of the pieces in this volume is both a personal and a geographical journey, and taken together they amount to a vivid picture of a changing world. 'Hogan is a portraitist of place, sometimes a minaturist, but the detail is exquisite... he writes superbly. This 'scrapbook' has a coherence, an identity, that comes only from a refusal to take things lightly while permitting lightness to the imagination.' - Ian Bell, The Herald. 'Hogan has a perfect eye for happenings at the edge and for the details that others ignore. He writes in the lyrical prose of a wandering, restless storyteller... his haunted, mesmeric style is laden with echoes and an elegaic richness.' - Sean Dunne, Cork Examiner. 'Hogan is not just a travelling fellow, but a sensitive and hyperliterate fellow traveller.' - Martin Cropper, Sunday Times. 'Hogan is an Irish writer of exceptional talent and sensitivity - a true original. A beautiful book.' - Midweek

  • Anglais The Growth Illusion

    Douthwaite Richard

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 1 September 2011

    Short-listed for 1992 GPA Award. Is economic growth improving our lives? In 1992, when the first edition of The Growth Illusion appeared, most people had little doubt that the answer was 'Yes'. Today, however, the climate of opinion has changed and there is widespread acceptance that, while growth might be necessary to generate jobs, the development path we are following isn't making life better for ourselves or our children.This new, revised edition of The Growth Illusion explains what has gone wrong. Douthwaite argues that since the 1950s, governments around the world have made economic growth their primary focus in the belief that by baking the biggest national cake, they are creating the resources needed to fulfill their political goals. Recent research in the USA, Britain, Germany and Australia shows that this 'growth first, goals later' strategy isn't working and that in the past fifteen years the growth process has actually destroyed more resources than it has created on a sustainable basis. As these economies run backwards, their citizens become worse off. So why is growth still paramount? Like an aircraft maintaining a minimum airspeed to stay aloft, so an economy must maintain a minimum growth rate if it is not to plunge into a deep depression. If demand fails to increase in any year, less investment will be made the following year, people will be thrown out of work and the economy will begin to unwind. The Growth Illusion explores this trap and many other topics along the way, asking fundamental questions about economics and the society in which we live. In this revised and reworked edition, case studies and statistics have been brought up to date and amplified by new research. Douthwaite identifies recent changes in public attitudes to growth as the beginnings of an intellectual revolution as far-reaching in its consequences for human survival as those initiated by Copernicus or Darwin in their re-assessment of man's place in creation. 'Growth has pushed the economic system beyond safe environmental limits,' he writes. 'The present revolution involves our acceptance that Earth is finite and the laws of nature apply to us.' Press comments about The Growth Illusion: 'Truly a book for our times: a fierce and unrelenting critique of the failures of laissez-faire capitalism ... I commend The Growth Illusion to all.'- The Sunday Tribune – 'Here's an economist who can entertain, blowing the whistle on consumer idiocies ... After reading Douthwaite's vivid and convincing case studies it becomes impossible to hear a politician promising 'recovery' ... without feeling mingled pity and contempt' - The Independent on Sunday –"The Growth Illusion is simply indispensable for those who wish to empower themselves by getting a grip on an alternative model to the prevailing economics of misery. What is particularly impressive is the quality of the scholarship... The publication of this book is a very significant act in democratizing economics.' - Michael D. Higgins, Hot Press 'Douthwaite is no head-banger...The Growth Illusion is a big rich book with an old-fashioned resonance: economics as morality - it does something to hasten the day when capitalism is no longer left as the only game in town.' -The Irish Times 'A terrific book, splendidly written and meticulously researched. I have no hesitation in calling Richard Douthwaite one of the best environmental journalists in the world.' - James Downey, The Universe

  • Anglais Swift

    Arnold Bruce

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 15 February 2012

    Who was Jonathan Swift? Bruce Arnold's provocative book examines this enigmatic figure in the light of his relationships - with his lover Esther Vanhomrigh ('Vanessa'), his ward Esther Johnston ('Stella'), and his many great male friends: Congreve, Temple, Bolingbroke, Harley, Pope, Addison, Thomas Sheridan, and others. Though often caricatured as a bitter misanthrope, Swift can only be properly understood if we recognize his love of humanity and his capacity for friendship. Arnold traces this theme from Swift's youth in Ireland and his literary and political apprenticeship at Moor Park in Surrey, and on through the years of greatness - the brilliant satires and pamphlets, the Church diplomacy at the Court of Queen Anne, and the great writings of his maturity: the Drapier's Letters, A Modest Proposal, and Gulliver's Travels. Here, for the first time, Swift's long and varied life is illustrated through contemporary engravings of the places he lived in, the people he knew, and the leading figures who defined his age.

  • Anglais The Songman

    Sands Tommy

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 15 February 2012

    With a Fenian fiddle in one ear and an Orange drum in the other', singer Tommy Sands was reared in the foothills of the Mourne mountains, where he still lives. As a child, he was immersed in folk music - his father played the fiddle, his mother the accordion. The kitchen was where Protestant and Catholic farmers alike would gather for songs and storytelling at the end of a day's harvesting. During the sixties and seventies Tommy was chief songwriter for The Sands Family, who played wherever they were welcome, from local wakes and weddings to New York's Carnegie Hall; his songs have been recorded by Joan Baez, Dolores Keane, Dick Gaughan and The Dubliners. He tells of his family's traditional way of life; of the turbulent days of the civil rights movement; The Bothy Band brawling in Brittany; encounters with Alan Stivell, Mary O'Hara and Pete Seeger; Ian Paisley on his radio show Country Céilí and a 'defining moment' during the Good Friday Agreement talks, when he organized an impromptu performance with children and Lambeg drummers. The Songman is a memoir replete with warmth and wit. 'Tommy Sands' words fairly 'freewheel down the hill' but they also have a great zest to 'sow the seeds of justice'. You feel you can trust the singer as well as the song.' - Seamus Heaney 'Tommy Sands has achieved that difficult but wonderful balance between knowing and loving the traditions of his home as well as being concerned with the future of the whole world.' - Pete Seeger

  • Anglais Setting Foot on the Shores of Connemara

    Robinson Tim

    • Lilliput press digital
    • 15 February 2012

    Islands and Images' describes the Aran Islands themselves; 'Setting Foot on the Shores of Connemara', the title-essay, elevates the map-maker's craft into art; 'The View from Errisbeg' integrates the landscapes of Galway Bay, the Burren and Connemara by way of topography, botany and geology; 'Space, Time and Connemara', centrepiece to the collection, surveys the archaeology and human geography of the West, its settlement patterns, families, dispersals and privations, its missioners and the modern tide of tourism and mariculture; 'A Connemara Fractal' is a fascinating autobiographical digression through Cambridge and the convergences of mathematics, geometry and geology, towards landscape-theory and the Book of Connemara as yet unwritten; 'Place/Person/Book' introduces Synge's masterwork, The Aran Islands; 'Listening to the Landscape' takes for its theme the Irish language and placenames as an emanation of the land; 'Four Threads' connects four archetypal figures - smuggler, rebel priest, land-agent and wandering rhymer - to their histories in nineteenth century Connemara. Other texts rehearse the potencies of discovery, botanical (Erica mackaiana in Roundstone), archaeological (a Bronze Age quartz alignment in Gleninagh) and personal. Some are anecdotal, some meditative; each is individually conceived as a work of literature. Tim Robinson has been stepping into spacetime since 1972, mapping the unknown by way of the known. With Setting Foot on the Shore of Connemara he captures the numinous in a net of words and images, and creates his own illuminated manual of memory.In these fourteen related works we witness a great writer, artist and cartographer united with his subject, conveying the vivid experiences of a quarter-century of exploring and mapping the Aran Islands, the Burren and Connemara. Tim Robinson, map-maker and writer, was born in England in 1935. He studied mathematics at Cambridge and worked as a teacher and artist in Istanbul, Vienna and London. In 1972 he moved to the West of Ireland and began writing and making maps. He now lives in Roundstone, Connemara. 'Potent and original.' The Irish Times 'Robinson's prose speaks more powerfully than a camera ... captivating and totally rewarding.' SUC Bulletin 'Belongs in every cultivated Irish home.' Michael Viney, The Irish Times 'In these glittering essays he is by turn historian, archaeologist, geographer, cartographer, botanist and, above all, a ravishing storyteller.' Penny Perrick, The Times

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