Penguin Books India Digital

  • Anglais DORK

    Sidin Vadukut

    In April 2006 Robin 'Einstein' Varghese, a stupendously naïve young man graduates from one of India's best business schools with a job at Dufresne Partners, a mediocre mid-market management consulting firm largely run by complete morons. Varghese finds that he fits into the culture remarkably well. Or does he?
    Through a stunning series of blunders, mishaps and inadvertent errors, Robin begins to make his superiors rue the day they were driven by desperation into hiring him. Dork is for all of those who've ever sat depressed in cubicles and wanted to kill themselves with office stationery.

  • A CLASSIC COMING-OF-AGE STORY WHICH HAS HELD GENERATIONS OF READERS SPELLBOUND
    Rusty, a sixteen-year-old Anglo-Indian boy, is orphaned, and has to live with his English guardian in the claustrophobic European part in Dehra Dun. Unhappy with the strict ways of his guardian, Rusty runs away from home to live with his Indian friends. Plunging for the first time into the dream-bright world of the bazaar, Hindu festivals and other aspects of Indian life, Rusty is enchanted . . . and is lost forever to the prim proprieties of the European community.
    This special edition marks the 60th anniversary of this award-winning book, written when the author was just seventeen. Poignant, heart-warming and an absolute classic, this book is forever a joy to read.

  • In the five years of his life that this book traces, Rusty's story is taken forward to his adolescent years. His world is turned topsy-turvy as many upheavals besiege him. After his father and grandmother pass away in quick succession, the twelve-year-old is left in the care of a guardian, Mr Harrison, in Dehra. But after a mysterious incident involving his stepfather and the gardener, he is sent away to boarding school. Restlessness compels him to run away from school, with an ambition to travel the world.
    But the plan fails, and he is soon back in Dehra, with his strict guardian. Rusty is now seventeen. He rebels and leaves home again, this time for good.

    Adventurous and thought-provoking, Rusty Runs Away is a book that children and young adults everywhere will enjoy.

  • Extraordinary stories about ordinary people's lives
    Over the years, Sudha Murty has come across some fascinating people whose lives make for interesting stories and have astonishing lessons to reveal. Take Vishnu, who achieves every material success but never knows happiness; or Venkat, who talks so much that he has no time to listen. In other stories, a young girl goes on a train journey that changes her life forever; an impoverished village woman provides bathing water to hundreds of people in a drought-stricken area; a do-gooder ghost decides to teach a disconsolate young man Sanskrit; and in the title story, a woman in a flooded village in Odisha teaches the author a life lesson she will never forget.
    From the bestselling author of Wise and Otherwise and The Old Man and His God, this is another heart-warming collection of real-life stories that will delight readers of all ages.

  • Murali Krishnan aka Mooli: a boy whose meddling ways get him into trouble all the time.

    Supriya George aka Soups: a girl who loves reading and is full of super-smart ideas.

    They are best friends on a mission.

    To win a prize on the website WAYOUTS
    [World's As Yet Original Untried Tricks and Stunts]

    So they try out many untried tricks and stunts. And mess up the house. And trouble their parents. And create confusion at a medical college.

    But do they eventually win the prize?

    Pick up this easy-to-read book and find out how Meddling Mooli and
    Soups find new uses for toothpaste, outwit a bully and have some awesome, super cool adventures.

  • Najeeb's dearest wish is to work in the Gulf and earn enough money to send back home. He achieves his dream only to be propelled by a series of incidents, grim and absurd, into a slave-like existence herding goats in the middle of the Saudi desert. Memories of the lush, verdant landscape of his village and of his loving family haunt Najeebwhose only solace is the companionship of goats. In the end, the lonely young man contrives a hazardous scheme to escape his desert prison. Goat Days was published to acclaim in Malayalam and became a bestseller. One of the brilliant new talents of Malayalam literature, Benyamin's wry and tender telling transforms this strange and bitter comedy of Najeeb's life in the desert into a universal tale of loneliness and alienation.

  • Butterfingers is back, and ready to strike! Amar Kishen or Butterfingers, as he is popularly called, has a penchant for dropping things-'he can send books, bags, balls, even people flying just by touching them!

    Obsessed with football, Amar comes up with a brilliant plan-'a school football tournament where each class will play as a different 'country'. But like all Butterfingers plans, this too is doomed to run into obstacles. But with Butterfingers as the goalie, does his team really have a chance?
    Full of action and adventure, Goal, Butterfingers!, the second book in the Butterfingers series, will make you lose yourself in the hilarious exploits of Amar and his friends as they hurtle through various hare-brained schemes.

  • Ten classic stories from the master of Hindi literature

    Nearly a century after they were written, Premchand's numerous short stories, novels and plays, written both in Hindi and Urdu, continue to be a mirror to Indian society and its traditions.

    A Winter's Night and Other Stories brings together, for young readers, some of his most powerful short stories. This is a world inhabited by people like Halku, forced to spend the bitterly cold winter night in the open, without a blanket; Kaki, the old invalid aunt, ill-treated by her own relatives; and Shankar, reduced to being a bonded labour for the sake of a handful of wheat. Premchand describes their plights with unflinching honesty. Yet all is not hopeless in this world. There is also little Hamid, who buys tongs for his old grandmother rather than toys for himself; Ladli, who saves her share of puris for her blind aunt; and Big Brother, trying in vain to remember the strange names of English kings and queens.

    Greed, dishonesty, cruelty abound in this world, as do kindness, bravery and humour. These ten stories are an ideal introduction to Premchand and his concerns and ideas that remain relevant to this day.

  • The world stands so dazzled by India's meteoric economic rise that we hesitate to acknowledge its consequences to the people and the environment. In Churning the Earth, Aseem Shrivastava and Ashish Kothari engage in a timely enquiry of this impressive growth story. They present incontrovertible evidence on how the nature of this recent growth has been predatory and question its sustainability. Unfettered development has damaged the ecological basis that makes life possible for hundreds of millions resulting in conflicts over water, land and natural resources, and increasing the chasm between the rich and the poor, threatening the future of India as a civilization.

    Rich with data and stories, this eye-opening critique of India's development strategy argues for a radical ecological democracy based on the principles of environmental sustainability, social equity and livelihood security. Shrivastava and Kothari urge a fundamental shift towards such alternatives-'already emerging from a range of grassroots movements-'if we are to forestall the descent into socio-ecological chaos.

    Churning the Earth is unique in presenting not only what is going wrong in India, but also the ways out of the crises that globalised growth has precipitated.

  • Gulzar is regarded as one of India's foremost Urdu poets today, renowned for his unusual perspectives on life, his keen understanding of the complexities of human relationships, and his striking imagery. After Selected Poems, a collection of some of his best poetry translated by Pavan K. Varma was extremely well received, Gulzar has chosen to present his next sixty poems in an inimitable way: labelling them Neglected Poems.
    'Neglected' only in name, these poems represent Gulzar at his creative and imaginative best, as he meditates on nature (the mountains, the monsoon, a sparrow), delves into human psychology (when a relationship ends one is amazed to notice that 'everything goes on exactly as it used to'), explores great cities like Mumbai, Chennai, Kolkata, Delhi and New York ('In your town, my friend, how is it that there are no homes for ants?'), and confronts the most telling moments of everyday life.

  • Jhootha Sach is arguably the most outstanding piece of Hindi literature written about the Partiton. Reviving life in Lahore as it was before 1947, the book opens on a nostalgic note, with vivid descriptions of the people that lived in the city's streets and lanes like Bhola Pandhe Ki Gali: Tara, who wanted an education above marriage; Puri, whose ideology and principles often came in the way of his impoverished circumstances; Asad, who was ready to sacrifice his love for the sake of communal harmony. Their lives-'and those of other memorable characters-'are forever altered as the carnage that ensues on the eve of Independence shatters the beauty and peace of the land, killing millions of Hindus and Muslims, and forcing others to leave their homes forever.

    Published in English translation for the first time, Yashpal's controversial novel is a politically charged, powerful tale of human suffering.

  • One of the giants of Hindi literature, Jainendra introduced the 'psychological' in Hindi fiction. Questions of love, marriage and relationships occupy much of Jainendra's works, taking them into the realm of the internal and the intimate. In The Resignation, Jainendra tells the story of Mrinal, a young woman whose uncompromising idealism results in her family and society rejecting her completely. Almost seventy-five years after it was written, the story of Mrinal's struggle against stultifying social norms and her fierce individualism remain startlingly relevant.

  • Anglais 100 Lyrics

    Gulzar

    From 'Mora gora ang lai le', his first film lyric written for Bimal Roy's Bandini in 1963, to the Oscar-winning 'Jai ho' from Slumdog Millionaire, Gulzar has brought a rare poetic sensibility to popular Hindi film music over a five-decade-long career. His sophisticated insights into psychological complexities, his ability to capture the essence of nature's sounds and spoken dialects in written words, and above all his inimitable-'and often surprising-'imagery have entertained his legions of fans over successive generations. It represents Gulzar's most memorable compositions of all time, and feature anecdotes about the composition of the lyrics as well as sketches by Gulzar.

  • When all has been tried, yet
    Justice is not in sight,
    It is then right to pick up the sword,
    It is then right to fight.

    Written in exquisite Persian verse, the Zafarnama was a defiant message composed by Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth Sikh Guru, and addressed to the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb, following a series of fierce battles between the imperial forces and Sikh warriors. With wisdom and honesty, the Guru indicts the emperor for the moral and spiritual bankruptcy of his empire. These 111 stirring stanzas, which form the core of the Guru's spiritual philosophy, highlight his deep understanding of the true nature of God and Creation.

    In this evocative translation, Navtej Sarna brings to life the valiant voice of Guru Gobind Singh and the power of his poetic genius in a passionate disavowal of tyranny that remains ever relevant.

  • With 750 million people living in villages, India has the largest rural population in the world. Based on his Indian experience, Dr Kalam recommends a sustainable and inclusive development system called PURA-'Providing Urban Amenities in Rural Areas-'to uplift the rural masses not by subsidies but through entrepreneurship with community participation. To make his case, Dr Kalam cites the examples of individuals and institutions, in India and from across the world, who, with an entrepreneurial spirit and a burning desire to make a difference, have successfully generated and tapped into the potential of the rural masses.

    Fabio Luiz de Oliveira Rosa changed the face of the rural district of Palmares, Brazil, by acquiring for the farmers access to electricity and water, which effect combined with better agricultural methods led to an increase in prosperity and stemmed the migration to the cities

    The 123-strong Magar clan owned Magarpatta, a 430-acre plot on the outskirts of Pune, Maharashtra. In the 1990s, they organized and set up the Magarpatta city which is now home to over 35,000 residents and a working population of 65,000, and boasts of an IT park.

  • Amir Khusrau, one of the greatest poets of medieval India, helped forge a distinctive synthesis of Muslim and Hindu cultures. Written in Persian and Hindavi, his poems and ghazals were appreciated across a cosmopolitan Persianate world that stretched from Turkey to Bengal. Having thrived for centuries, Khusrau's poetry continues to be read and recited to this day. In the Bazaar of Love is the first comprehensive selection of Khusrau's work, offering new translations of mystical and romantic poems and fresh renditions of old favourites. Covering a wide range of genres and forms, it evokes the magic of one of the best-loved poets of the Indian subcontinent.

  • In a comic case of mistaken identity; wildlife photographers Krupakar and Senani were kidnapped one night from their home at the edge of the Bandipur National Park by Veerappan; India's 'most dreaded bandit'. He thought they were important government officials; and his plan was to hold them hostage in return for clemency and a substantial ransom.

    The bandit and his gang kept the hostages on the move in the forest; and their only contact with the outside world was via an old transistor radio. While Veerappan;who had already killed some 250 people; formulated strategies to force the government to agree to his demands; his hostages not only got a close look at the plant and animal diversity in the forests of Karnataka and Tamil Nadu; but the intimacy of their life on the run gave them an insight into Veerappan's strange mix of cruelty and humanity. Though Krupakar and Senani came from a world that was completely different from that of Veerappan's gang; the kidnapped and the kidnappers became closely involved in each other's concerns. Birds; Beasts and Bandits is a witty and poignant account of an extraordinary adventure with the notorious poacher and his companions.

  • A chronicle of Rusty's rebellious, eventful progression into manhood.

    Rusty, having run away from his guardian's home, is now trying to define his identity as he lives
    with the Kapoor family, tutoring their son Kishen and occupying the room on the roof.

    Soon, he becomes close to Kishen and, in the company of Meena Kapoor, begins to come into his own as an individual. Then tragedy strikes-'Meena's death evastates Rusty, and he leaves Dehra. Rusty and Kishen take to the open road, and their adventures accumulate as they tramp through the Doon valley and the Garhwal hills.

    Full of incident as well as introspection, this is a book older children will thoroughly enjoy.

  • Thirteen-year-old Atiya will win the hearts of young readers. Although physically handicapped; her adventurous spirit takes her on lonely rambles into the wildlife sanctuary. She knows the ways of the jungle and its creatures great and small.

    A charming story; full of incident and good feeling. Atiya's flute has a special magic of its own.'-'Ruskin Bond

    Atiya Sardare lives with her dad; a forest officer. An only child; afflicted by polio; she finds solace and peace in the jungle; exploring it on short; secret; often dangerous treks. On one occasion she hears the haunting notes of a flute. It gives her goose bumps. She vows to learn to play the instrument much against her father's wishes. Her music lessons bring her close to the grouchy old anthropologist; Ogre Uncle; and his Kurumba tribal daughter; Mishora. Atiya's gift transforms her father's view; it calms the rogue elephant; Rangappa and helps nurture a blossoming friendship between a teenage boy and girl.

    A moving; tender; and mesmerizing tale; Flute in the Forest has wonderful incidents based on the real-life experiences of the author.

  • Watch out! With Butterfingers around, nothing and no one is safe!Amar Kishen, nicknamed Butterfingers, can send books, balls, bats, people, anything flying! When school term begins, the Green Park Under 15 cricket team, of which Butter is the vice captain, is determined to win the Colonel Nadkarni Under 15 Inter-School Limited Overs Cricket Trophy. Practice begins in earnest, but disasters soon follow. Will Amar's team win the coveted trophy and save the school's grounds? Or will it slip from their grasp like a classic Butterfingers catch?

  • Perceptions of Rahul Gandhi have ranged from the great Indian hope to that of an over-
    promoted dynastic scion. Everyone has an opinion, but the man himself remains opaque, his public persona confined to positions on political events, policies or programmes.

    Who is Rahul Gandhi-'the real man-'beneath the hype and the hatchet jobs?
    What are the ideas and influences that propel him? Who are his advisers? And
    how will he tackle his new responsibilities as his mother, Sonia Gandhi, makes way for him?

    Two young journalists, Jatin Gandhi and Veenu Sandhu, trace the evolution of the Rahul brand and explore the fascinating relationship between modernity and dynasty in this incisive political biography.

  • Take the way we go about buying a new car. We identify an auspicious date and time, then proceed to break a coconut, plonk a plastic deity of Ganesha on the dashboard, and zoom off at great speed, refusing to wear our seatbelts.
    Supposedly educated, smart and tech-savvy, Indians can be surprisingly unscientific in their daily lives. Think of the crores spent every year remodelling homes according to vaastu, in the hope of changing luck; and the continued horrors of female infanticide, because it is only the son who can help the father's journey to heaven...
    This unsparingly critical, scathingly analytical book points out the shocking lack of scientific temper among the vast majority of Indians, and how this holds us up as a nation in the twenty-first century.

  • The body was the only truth she knew. It was the body alone that was left, even as she went beyond the body.'
    Journeys form the leitmotif of these astonishing new stories by Ambai. Sometimes culminating in an unconventional love affair, some are extraordinary tales of loyalty and integrity; others touch on the almost fantastic, absurd aspect of Mumbai. Yet others explore the notion of a wholesome self, and its tragic absence at times. These stories are illuminated by vivid and unusual characters: from an eccentric, penurious singer-couple who adopt an ape as their son, to a male prostitute, who is battered by bimbos for not giving 'full' satisfaction.
    Crucially, some of the stories, like the title one, engage uninhibitedly with a woman's relationship to her body. For Ambai, feminist par excellence, the sensual body, experienced as a natural landscape changing with age, is at the same time, the only vehicle of life and tool for mapping the external world.

  • Gulzar, one of India's finest film-makers and lyricists and has always been a poet at heart. His oeuvre is steeped in a poetic sensibility, marked by a lyricism rare in the world of Hindi cinema. Today, Gulzar is regarded as one of India's foremost Urdu poets, unparalleled in his exploration of human relationships and the insight and sensitivity with which he addresses the many facets of daily life.
    The sophistication and cadences of Gulzar's work come alive in this bilingual edition of some of his best poetry, sensitively translated by Pavan K. Varma.

empty