• When Roberta, Peter and Phyllis' dad is suddenly and unexpectedly sent to prison, the children are suddenly pulled away from their comfortable suburban life. They move with their mother to the "Three Chimneys," a countryside house that sits near the railway. As the children settle into their new life, the railway allows them to meet and befriend a series of characters, some of whom need their help, and some whom might just be able to help them.
    First published in 1905 as a serial, "The Railway Children" has been popular with readers from its beginning. It has been adapted to the screen and the stage several times, and remain a children's favourite to this day.

  • A level 2 Oxford Bookworms Library graded reader. Retold for Learners of English by Diane Mowat
    When the children dug a hole in the gravel-pit, they were very surprised at what they found. 'It' was a Psammead, a sand-fairy, thousands of years old.
    It was a strange little thing - fat and furry, and with eyes on long stalks. It was often very cross and unfriendly, but it could give wishes - one wish a day. 'How wonderful!' the children said.
    But wishes are difficult things. They can get you into trouble . . .

  • A level 3 Oxford Bookworms Library graded reader. Retold for Learners of English by John Escott
    'We have to leave our house in London,' Mother said to the children. 'We're going to live in the country, in a little house near a railway line.'
    And so begins a new life for Roberta, Peter, and Phyllis. They become the railway children - they know all the trains, Perks the station porter is their best friend, and they have many adventures on the railway line.
    But why has their father had to go away? Where is he, and will he ever come back?

  • A level 2 Oxford Bookworms Library graded reader. This version includes an audio book: listen to the story as you read.
    Retold for Learners of English by Diane Mowat.
    When the children dug a hole in the gravel-pit, they were very surprised at what they found. 'It' was a Psammead, a sand-fairy, thousands of years old.
    It was a strange little thing - fat and furry, and with eyes on long stalks. It was often very cross and unfriendly, but it could give wishes - one wish a day. 'How wonderful!' the children said.
    But wishes are difficult things. They can get you into trouble . . .

  • A level 3 Oxford Bookworms Library graded reader. This version includes an audio book: listen to the story as you read.
    Retold for Learners of English by John Escott.
    'We have to leave our house in London,' Mother said to the children. 'We're going to live in the country, in a little house near a railway line.'
    And so begins a new life for Roberta, Peter, and Phyllis. They become the railway children - they know all the trains, Perks the station porter is their best friend, and they have many adventures on the railway line.
    But why has their father had to go away? Where is he, and will he ever come back?

  • A princess is locked away on a remote island guarded by a dragon. Many suitors try and fail to save her, but one day a clever boy arrives. So begins `The Island of Nine Whirlpools`, one of Edith Nesbitt's eight dragon stories in `The Book of Dragons' (1899). The tales may be over a hundred years old, but they contain a timeless quality that ignites the imagination and creates a sense of wonder. Child or adult, these stories are written with such warmth and wit, anyone will find themselves laughing out loud with regular intervals. They may revoke a certain Tolkien feeling, and C.S. Lewis, who read Nesbitt's books as a child, was clearly inspired by her works.

  • Cyril, Anthea, Robert and Jane are "the sort of people that wonderful things happen to." And the children have yet more adventures ahead of them. Following up on "Five Children and It" and "The Phoenix and the Carpet", they once again meet the wish-granting Psammead fairy. This time, he guides them to an ancient Amulet that will help them find their hearts' desire, but it is only half an amulet, and the search for the other half will have them whizzing about through time.

  • The Bastable children, which some readers may remember from "The Treasure Seekers," are sent to stay in the countryside. The children (and Pincher the dog) have every intention of being well-behaved... but is the country really large enough to contain their exuberance?

  • "What would you have done? Rubbed your eyes and thought you were dreaming? Well, if you had, nothing more would have happened. Nothing ever does when you behave like that."

    In 'The Aunt and Amabel' a young girl damages a special flower-bed without meaning to, and as a punishment her aunt sends her to the bedroom with the large wardrobe. When Amabel finds a railway timetable naming a station called 'Bigwardrobeinspareroom' in there she is intrigued. And in opening the wardrobe, she finds something very unexpected on the inside.

    C.S. Lewis was famously a fan of E. Nesbit's children's stories growing up. 'The Aunt and Amabel' is the inspiration behind his masterpiece 'The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe' (1950).

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    E. Nesbit (1858-1924) was an English author, poet and political activist. She started writing in order to support the woman her husband had impregnated, but soon earned fame and succes as an author of children's books.

  • "Her arms rested on a table beside her, and her head on her hands; but her face was turned full forward, and her eyes met those of the spectator bewilderingly."

    One day, a man who has recently enherited his aunt's house, discovers a portait of a woman in the attic. He brings it downstairs and becomes so infatuated by the woman it portrays that he prays she will come to life. By some mysterious power she does, and he learns that the two of them have a daunting history. But how far will he go for the woman he loves?

    Beautiful and creepy, 'The Ebony Frame' is a haunting short story for fans of Oscar Wilde's 'The Picture of Dorian Gray'.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    E. Nesbit (1858-1924) was an English author, poet and political activist. She started writing in order to support the woman her husband had impregnated, but soon earned fame and succes as an author of children's books.

  • Do you believe in magic? Then fasten your seatbelt and join the ride as The Three C's - Charlotte, Caroline, and Charles - try to figure out where it can be found.

    Spending an adventurous summer while visiting their uncle, they discover both mysterious books and a wonderful garden that will change their lives forever. Especially one book catches their attention "The Language of Flowers" which seems to be an actual Spell book! As they try out some of the spells incredible things start to happen. Could this magic be real, or are the extraordinary events taking place merely coincidental? A fascinating book about the magic we can find in everyday life, and a story of what it means to be a child trying to find their way in an adult world.

    Great for fans of C.S. Lewis and Lewis Carroll.



    Born in Kennington in 1858, Edith Nesbit wrote and co-authored over 60 beloved adventures at the beginning of the 20th century. Among her most popular books are "The Story of the Treasure-Seekers" (1899), "The Phoenix and the Carpet" (1904), and "The Railway Children" (1906). Many of her works became adapted to musicals, movies, and TV shows. Along with her husband Hubert Bland, she was among the first members of the Fabian society - a socialist debating club. A path in London close to her home was named "Railway Children Walk" in her honor, manifesting her legacy as one of the pioneers within the children's fantasy genre.

  • What is the most valuable thing in the world? Is it material things like money, or is it things that cannot be counted like love and friendship?

    This is the question the brave Bastable siblings face in Nesbit's first children's book, which served as an inspiration for C.S. Lewis' famous Narnia-series. The siblings set out on a mission to regain their family's wealth after their mother dies and their father's business collapses. As the six children go on humorous adventures, they are determined to turn their luck around by coming up with all sorts of crazy ideas for making money. Although they are having fun, nothing is really working. That is, until one journey takes an unexpected turn.

    A greatly inspirational and uplifting story that will warm your heart. For fans of C.S Lewis, Lemony Snicket and J.K. Rowling.



    Born in Kennington in 1858, Edith Nesbit wrote and co-authored over 60 beloved adventures at the beginning of the 20th century. Among her most popular books are "The Story of the Treasure-Seekers" (1899), "The Phoenix and the Carpet" (1904), and "The Railway Children" (1906). Many of her works became adapted to musicals, movies, and TV shows. Along with her husband Hubert Bland, she was among the first members of the Fabian society - a socialist debating club. A path in London close to her home was named "Railway Children Walk" in her honor, manifesting her legacy as one of the pioneers within the children's fantasy genre.

  • Funny characters, mischiefs and crazy adventures - this book has got it all.

    It contains both fairy tales and stories of the Bastable siblings known from the famous novel "The Story of the Treasure Seekers." Continuing their journey, Oswald tells us everything about what happens next.

    Which of the children are you most like? Are you a diplomat like Dora or brave like Alice? Perhaps sensitive like Noel? No matter what the siblings go through, they do it together. The family dynamic, however, is put to the test as they get into risky business.

    For fans of Lewis Carroll and Elizabeth Winthrop.

  • The Prophet's Mantle

    Edith Nesbit

    If you are looking for a great combination of romance and thriller, look no further.

    This exhilarating crime and romance novel takes place in a Victorian society and uncovers a tale in the most unexpected way. Although it is one of her lesser-known works, it was written by both Nesbit and her husband Hubert Bland. This novel is the only book the unusual couple wrote together, and throughout the story, it is noticeable that both of them had socialist beliefs.

    Culminating in a surprising plot twist, this book is recommended for thrill-seekers, romantics, fans of Sherlock Holmes, and anyone who is looking for mystery and drama.



    Born in Kennington in 1858, Edith Nesbit wrote and co-authored over 60 beloved adventures at the beginning of the 20th century. Among her most popular books are "The Story of the Treasure-Seekers" (1899), "The Phoenix and the Carpet" (1904), and "The Railway Children" (1906). Many of her works became adapted to musicals, movies, and TV shows. Along with her husband Hubert Bland, she was among the first members of the Fabian society - a socialist debating club. A path in London close to her home was named "Railway Children Walk" in her honor, manifesting her legacy as one of the pioneers within the children's fantasy genre.

  • Would you be happy if all your wishes could come true?

    Most people would assume the answer is "yes" but the five siblings of this story find out that it is not that simple.

    The adventure begins with a new carpet that has a glowing egg inside it and when it falls into an open fire it hatches a golden phoenix, the most famous of all mythical birds. The phoenix tells them that the carpet is enchanted, and it has the ability to grant the children three wishes every day.

    With the arrogant but wise bird by their side they go on amazing journeys. But not everything is as it seems, and the siblings learn that you have to be careful what you wish for.

    For fans of Frances Hodgson Burnett and Jonathan Rogers.



    Born in Kennington in 1858, Edith Nesbit wrote and co-authored over 60 beloved adventures at the beginning of the 20th century. Among her most popular books are "The Story of the Treasure-Seekers" (1899), "The Phoenix and the Carpet" (1904), and "The Railway Children" (1906). Many of her works became adapted to musicals, movies, and TV shows. Along with her husband Hubert Bland, she was among the first members of the Fabian society - a socialist debating club. A path in London close to her home was named "Railway Children Walk" in her honor, manifesting her legacy as one of the pioneers within the children's fantasy genre.

  • The Magic World

    Edith Nesbit

    What would you do if you found out magic is actually all around you?

    These twelve magical short stories are all about magic and how it can be found in unlikely places. The atmosphere of each story is similar to the fantastic universe of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland.

    They all contain important lessons for children as well as adults. In "The Cat-hood of Maurice," the protagonist learns to see life through another perspective and appreciate beings who are different from him. In "Kenneth and the Carp," a boy turns into a fish in order to prove his innocence. The story called "The Aunt and Amabel" is said to have inspired C.S. Lewis' famous Narnia-series because Amabel goes through a wardrobe and arrives in another world much like the Narnia children. A fairy-tale book like no other.

    Perfect for fans of Roald Dahl, Lyman Frank Baum and Dianna Wynne Jones.



    Born in Kennington in 1858, Edith Nesbit wrote and co-authored over 60 beloved adventures at the beginning of the 20th century. Among her most popular books are "The Story of the Treasure-Seekers" (1899), "The Phoenix and the Carpet" (1904), and "The Railway Children" (1906). Many of her works became adapted to musicals, movies, and TV shows. Along with her husband Hubert Bland, she was among the first members of the Fabian society - a socialist debating club. A path in London close to her home was named "Railway Children Walk" in her honor, manifesting her legacy as one of the pioneers within the children's fantasy genre.

  • The Rainbow and The Rose

    Edith Nesbit

    If you are one of those people who never give poetry a chance, this is your sign to try it.

    This playful compilation of poetry by the famous children's book author contains countless relatable themes and useful thoughts. The poems revolve around many topics, especially motherhood, love, religion, upbringing, married life, nature, and death. Follow Nesbit's journey as she tries to make sense of the world around her through an easy rhyming style.

    In her poem "Confessions," she uncovers that her own flaws as a human might also reveal something about life itself. In another poem named "Work," she worries about the endless repetitions of daily tasks known to us all, but she finds comfort in the small things in life, something many of us should try!



    Born in Kennington in 1858, Edith Nesbit wrote and co-authored over 60 beloved adventures at the beginning of the 20th century. Among her most popular books are "The Story of the Treasure-Seekers" (1899), "The Phoenix and the Carpet" (1904), and "The Railway Children" (1906). Many of her works became adapted to musicals, movies, and TV shows. Along with her husband Hubert Bland, she was among the first members of the Fabian society - a socialist debating club. A path in London close to her home was named "Railway Children Walk" in her honor, manifesting her legacy as one of the pioneers within the children's fantasy genre.

  • The Magic City

    Edith Nesbit

    If you could create your own world from scratch what would it look like? In this story the brave characters find out.

    10-year-old Philip becomes concerned when his sister marries the father of a girl named Lucy, whom Philip does not get along with. In order to escape the situation, Philip creates a magical world entirely from his own imagination.

    However, Philip soon realizes that he has to come to terms with the world he has created in order to face reality.

    Step into a courageous adventure where objects come alive and dragons are slain, and still every page tells you something about your own life. Perfect for fans of J.K.Rowling and J.M.Barrie.



    Born in Kennington in 1858, Edith Nesbit wrote and co-authored over 60 beloved adventures at the beginning of the 20th century. Among her most popular books are "The Story of the Treasure-Seekers" (1899), "The Phoenix and the Carpet" (1904), and "The Railway Children" (1906). Many of her works became adapted to musicals, movies, and TV shows. Along with her husband Hubert Bland, she was among the first members of the Fabian society - a socialist debating club. A path in London close to her home was named "Railway Children Walk" in her honor, manifesting her legacy as one of the pioneers within the children's fantasy genre.

  • Wet Magic

    Edith Nesbit

    This novel is the aquatic adventure of a lifetime.

    Four siblings, Francis, Mavis, Bernard, and Kathleen set out to rescue the sister of a mermaid who is being held captive at a circus.

    But who is good and who turns out evil? As always, appearances may deceive, and all is not as it seems.

    Meeting many new friends and gaining access to a secret kingdom underneath the sea, the siblings find themselves caught up in a war to save their new friends - the merpeople. Now, the siblings must confront their loyalty to each other as they fight for the goodness of the world.

    A timeless book, perfect for fans of C.S. Lewis, Bethany C. Morrow and J.K. Rowling, or anyone looking for a little bit of magic in their lives.



    Born in Kennington in 1858, Edith Nesbit wrote and co-authored over 60 beloved adventures at the beginning of the 20th century. Among her most popular books are "The Story of the Treasure-Seekers" (1899), "The Phoenix and the Carpet" (1904), and "The Railway Children" (1906). Many of her works became adapted to musicals, movies, and TV shows. Along with her husband Hubert Bland, she was among the first members of the Fabian society - a socialist debating club. A path in London close to her home was named "Railway Children Walk" in her honor, manifesting her legacy as one of the pioneers within the children's fantasy genre.

  • Grim Tales

    Edith Nesbit

    A short horror story collection titled "Grim Tales" is exactly what you would expect from an author named Edith Bland, but her pen name E. Nesbit has quite another reputation so don't let that scare you. Hopefully you can leave that to the stories.

    Well-versed in the realms of fantasy and magical kingdoms as a children's author, E. Nesbit has a knack for the supernatural, which she tackles here in seven fantastical tales. Take "The Ebony Frame" for example - a story about a man enchanted by a beautiful woman in a painting in his attic (no relation to "The Picture of Dorian Gray" aside from the incredibly obvious), or "Man-Size in Marble", in which, akin to the film "The Conjuring" (2013), a young couple ignore the warnings of buying a new house and spookiness ensues.

    Short story collections are like houseboats - you're only a page turn or anchor pull away from new friends and a new perspective... or possibly the cold depths of the abyss. And by reading this you're surely in pursuit of the latter?



    Edith Nesbit (1858 - 1924) (married name Edith Bland) was a prolific English author and poet, writing primarily children's books under the pen name E. Nesbit. Her work often characterized by a mix of realistic settings with fantastical elements, Nesbit went on to influence writers such as C.S. Lewis and J.K. Rowling. Her most notable works include "Five Children and It" (1902) and "The Railway Children" (1906) which have never gone out of print.

  • Wings and The Child

    Edith Nesbit

    It is often said that if you want to make the world a better place, start with children!

    Do you still remember what it was like to be a child? It was frustrating, and you often felt helpless, but it was also magical and carefree.

    We were all children once, and this is Nesbit's main reminder to us all.

    This autobiographical essay explains Nesbit's views on childhood and upbringing. She encourages every adult to teach children about creativity and to never dampen their spirits. She offers specific examples on how to motivate children to be inventive, not only for the benefit of their childhoods but for everyone who has forgotten the magic of imagination.



    Born in Kennington in 1858, Edith Nesbit wrote and co-authored over 60 beloved adventures at the beginning of the 20th century. Among her most popular books are "The Story of the Treasure-Seekers" (1899), "The Phoenix and the Carpet" (1904), and "The Railway Children" (1906). Many of her works became adapted to musicals, movies, and TV shows. Along with her husband Hubert Bland, she was among the first members of the Fabian society - a socialist debating club. A path in London close to her home was named "Railway Children Walk" in her honor, manifesting her legacy as one of the pioneers within the children's fantasy genre.

  • The Incomplete Amorist

    Edith Nesbit

    Throughout our lives most of us struggle with the big L: Love, and so does 18-year-old Betty Desmond.

    Brought up by a strict stepfather, the young girl makes an imprudent match when she falls in love with the artist Vernon. Everyone around them disapproves of the relationship, and consequently Betty gets sent away to Paris. But perhaps the City of Love is not the right place to forget your fancy?

    In Paris Betty meets one of Vernon's friends who falls for her. Surprisingly, Vernon also shows up with his ex-girlfriend, Lady St. Craye, and a full-blown love drama begins.

    Although Edith Nesbit is mostly known for her amazing children's books, this novel is her ultimate love story for adults.



    Born in Kennington in 1858, Edith Nesbit wrote and co-authored over 60 beloved adventures at the beginning of the 20th century. Among her most popular books are "The Story of the Treasure-Seekers" (1899), "The Phoenix and the Carpet" (1904), and "The Railway Children" (1906). Many of her works became adapted to musicals, movies, and TV shows. Along with her husband Hubert Bland, she was among the first members of the Fabian society - a socialist debating club. A path in London close to her home was named "Railway Children Walk" in her honor, manifesting her legacy as one of the pioneers within the children's fantasy genre.

  • The Enchanted Castle

    Edith Nesbit

    Imagine if magic was real, would it be used for good or evil? Kathleen, Gerald, and Jimmy is about to find out.

    During a summer vacation, the three children find a mysterious house with what appears to be a sleeping princess in the garden. When they wake her up and find out that she is the housekeeper's niece, an adventure begins.

    The niece, Mabel, has a magical ring, and making the wearer invisible is just one of the many things it can do.

    But soon the children find out that magic is not all good and using it can go horribly wrong. In order to control it, they must find courage and strength that they have never experienced before.

    Revealing the wonderful world of children similar to J.M. Barrie's "Peter Pan," this is one of the many enchanted tales Nesbit is known for.



    Born in Kennington in 1858, Edith Nesbit wrote and co-authored over 60 beloved adventures at the beginning of the 20th century. Among her most popular books are "The Story of the Treasure-Seekers" (1899), "The Phoenix and the Carpet" (1904), and "The Railway Children" (1906). Many of her works became adapted to musicals, movies, and TV shows. Along with her husband Hubert Bland, she was among the first members of the Fabian society - a socialist debating club. A path in London close to her home was named "Railway Children Walk" in her honor, manifesting her legacy as one of the pioneers within the children's fantasy genre.

  • New Treasure Seekers

    Edith Nesbit

    Have you ever wanted to help someone but ended up making things worse?

    In this collection of short tales we follow the Bastable children who find themselves in exactly that situation.

    Even though the siblings try to do good, they always end up getting into trouble. This time, they get arrested, try fortune-telling, spend a spooky night at an old windmill, and try to change their horrible cousin Archibald. Each story offers deep insight into hilarious characters.

    Sharing similar themes with Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" this is a funny and engaging book revolving around children, but for every adventurer.



    Born in Kennington in 1858, Edith Nesbit wrote and co-authored over 60 beloved adventures at the beginning of the 20th century. Among her most popular books are "The Story of the Treasure-Seekers" (1899), "The Phoenix and the Carpet" (1904), and "The Railway Children" (1906). Many of her works became adapted to musicals, movies, and TV shows. Along with her husband Hubert Bland, she was among the first members of the Fabian society - a socialist debating club. A path in London close to her home was named "Railway Children Walk" in her honor, manifesting her legacy as one of the pioneers within the children's fantasy genre.

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